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QUESTION 1

Directions: Answer the two questions listed below. Each answer should be typed in no more than 2 pages per answer with 12-point font and 1-inch margins. All answers should be written in an essay format and exhibit clear, concise, and carefully-edited writing. When you analyze a work of art, be sure to discuss it in terms of form (its style) as well as content (it's meaning) and context (its relationship to the time in which it was created). Upon the first reference to artwork, including the artist’s name, title (in italics), and date. When you cite an article, describe the specific argument the author raises. You must cite your sources, but you do not need to use foot or endnotes; rather, use simple parenthetical citations with the author’s last name (see syllabus) and page number - example: (Cash, 122).

Discuss only two photographers that appropriate or reference components from visual culture, advertising, or the history of art and photography to critique or respond to these images. Why do they reference this material and what are their particular methods of doing so? Analyze a specific work by both artists you discuss in detail. Reference at least one assigned article to back up your response. Choose two of these artists in your response: Carrie Mae Weems + Lorna Simpson*(Both are Included in PowerPoint to reference their works) Renée Cox, Mickalene Thomas, Hank Willis Thomas, or Wangechi Mutu.  *use the underlined artists for next question below* 

QUESTION 2

The Power and Limitations of Photography and Video as Activism. Bell hooks writes, “The history of black liberation movements in the US could be 2 characterized as a struggle over images as much as a struggle for rights” (hooks, 57). More recently, Allissa V. Richardson has expressed concern that there are “few mass communication channels that African Americans can rely on to get their news.” (Richardson, 693). Many photographers, whether they’re acting as reporters, documentarians, or artists, use their images to bring about political and social change. Discuss two artists (USE CONSUMING BLACKNESS POWERPOINT FOR HANK W.T. +WANGECHI MUTU) who use photography or video to generate awareness and change. 

How and why do they use their images to draw attention to a particular situation? 

How can their images promote their agenda, yet how are these images inherently limiting? 

Make sure to discuss two images you choose in detail. (Powerpoint for images)

*Reference at least one assigned article to back up your response. ARTICLE IS ATTACHED ALSO DON’T HAVE TO REFERENCE MUCH JUST A FEW POINTS. You can choose any two artists or reporters discussed throughout the semester, BUT do NOT address the same artists you used in question #1 

Sample Case Study Analysis:

ORDER: 26223 Topic: African American Photography Pages: 3 Sources: 3 Format: MLA Deadline: 10 hours The requirements for work: - Times New Roman, 12pts - approx. 300 words/page, double spaced - 1-inch margins all sides - proper APA/MLA formatting - cover page + references - original work Instructions: 2 Separate questions. Each question requires using the two artists and on the directions (will be provided separately) it will say who to select. The class article used as a reference for question 2 is also one of the files that will be provided separately (the reading). No works cited necessary just in text citations.--e.x. (Harris, 130).

African American Photography

 

Answer 1

Visual Culture, advertising or history of art and photography

The two photographers chose include Carrie Mae Weems and Lorna Simpson. They incorporate components from visual culture, advertising, or the history of art and photography in many ways. Her photos and short movies, as gimlet-looked at and gutsy as they are outwardly convincing, have gone far toward resetting our desires for pictures and testing our presumptions about her to a great extent African-American subjects. A skilled storyteller who works accessibly in content and pictures, she's made new stories around ladies, non-white individuals and average workers networks, conjuring lavish craftsmanship from the bone-dry polemics of character. The longing to take pictures has not felt amazing, something Weems comprehended from the first occasion when she held her own camera.

It is difficult to exaggerate the effect of "The Kitchen Table Series" (1989-90), which joins boards of content and picture to recount to the tale of a placid lady with a "bodacious way, shifted abilities, hard chuckling, numerous sentiments," as it peruses. The arrangement made her vocation and propelled another age of specialists who had at no other time seen a lady of shading watching certainly out at them from a gallery divider, and for whom Weems' work spoke to the first run through an African-American lady could be seen mirroring her own understanding and interiority in her craft.

Weems is additionally an agile comedian — a lady of the hour with her mouth taped shut in "Considerations on Marriage" (1990), a counterfeit style appears for "Afro Chic" (2009) — yet her silliness is for the most part of the more unsettlingly pointed kind, pointed legitimately at our priggish tasteful establishments. In a 1997 arrangement, "Not Manet's Type," she plays a dream, her negligee-clad appearance before a bed, viewed and externalized — or essentially imperceptible. "It was clear I was not Manet's sort," the going with content peruses. "Picasso — who had a particular talent with ladies — just utilized me and Duchamp never at any point thought about me."

Her photos and short movies, as gimlet-looked at and gutsy as they are outwardly convincing, have gone far toward resetting our desires for pictures and testing our presumptions about her to a great extent African-American subjects. A skilled storyteller who works accessibly in content and pictures, she's made new stories around ladies, non-white individuals and average workers networks, conjuring lavish craftsmanship from the bone-dry polemics of character. The longing to take pictures has not felt amazing, something Weems comprehended from the first occasion when she held her own camera. She was 20, and it was a birthday present from her sweetheart, Raymond, a Marxist and work, coordinator.

Before long she was turning the focal point on herself to address inquiries of portrayal. It is difficult to exaggerate the effect of "The Kitchen Table Series" (1989-90), which joins boards of content and picture to recount to the tale of a placid lady with a "bodacious way, shifted abilities, hard chuckling, numerous sentiments," as it peruses. The arrangement made her vocation and propelled another age of specialists who had at no other time seen a lady of shading watching certainly out at them from a gallery divider, and for whom Weems' work spoke to the first run through an African-American lady could be seen mirroring her own understanding and interiority in her craft.

Lorna Simpson originally turned out to be outstanding in the mid-1980s for her huge scale photo and-content works that go up against and challenge restricted, customary perspectives on sexual orientation, character, culture, history, and memory. With unidentified figures as a visual purpose of takeoff, Simpson utilizes the figure to look at the manners by which sexual orientation and culture shape the communications, connections, and encounters of our lives in contemporary America.

In the mid-1990s, she started making enormous multi-board photos imprinted on felt that portray the locales of open – yet concealed – sexual experiences. After some time she went to film and video works in which people participate in baffling discussions that appear to address the puzzles of both personality and want. All through her group of work, Simpson addresses memory and portrayal, regardless of whether in her moving juxtaposition of content and pictures, in her frightful video projection Cloudscape and its reverberation in the felt work Cloud, or in her enormous scale video establishment Momentum which reproduces a youth move execution. Utilizing the camera as an impetus, Simpson builds work involving content and pictures, parts to wholes, which remark on the narrative idea of found or organized pictures. In Simpson's most recent works, trademark inner conflict is given foggy ink washes to introduce secluded figures in the midst of indistinct spaces–an arrival to and takeoff from her prior unidentified figures in an extended investigation of contemporary culture.

Answer 2
The Power and Limitations of Photography and Video as Activism

The two photographers chosen include Hank Willis Thomas and WangechiMutu. They use photography or video to generate awareness and change. Thomas observes: "I believe that in part, advertising's success rests on its ability to reinforce generalizations around race, gender, and ethnicity which can be entertaining, sometimes true, and sometimes horrifying, but which at a core level are a reflection of the way a culture views itself or its aspirations.” Hank Willis Thomas quoted in Deborah Willis, “Triumph & Image Hank Willis Thomas,” aperture 209 (Winter 2012): 72.

“Racism is the most successful advertising campaign of all time. Africans have hundreds if not thousands of years of culture. Having all of these people packed into ships and then told they’re all the same, reducing them to a single identity—that’s absolute power.” – Hank Willis Thomas, 2003.

Wangechi Mutu on her Ark series: “Either the super-traditional African woman with the big earrings or scarification…or this other woman which kind of is a pin-up, a very vile erotic sexualized pinup. This two objectification are placed together and there’s this kind of dialogue going on between them … They’re very interesting to look at but ultimately I remove the most titillating parts. The central part of the shot is removed and what you have is this synergy between the two. And I think it’s a fantastic kind of harmony that happens and it makes people reflect on both things without replicating the objectification of either one of them.”

Lorna Simpson originally turned out to be outstanding in the mid-1980s for her huge scale photo and-content works that go up against and challenge restricted, customary perspectives on sexual orientation, character, culture, history, and memory. With unidentified figures as a visual purpose of takeoff, Simpson utilizes the figure to look at the manners by which sexual orientation and culture shape the communications, connections, and encounters of our lives in contemporary America. In the mid-1990s, she started making enormous multi-board photos imprinted on felt that portray the locales of open – yet concealed – sexual experiences. After some time she went to film and video works in which people participate in baffling discussions that appear to address the puzzles of both personality and want.

All through her group of work, Simpson addresses memory and portrayal, regardless of whether in her moving juxtaposition of content and pictures, in her frightful video projection Cloudscape and its reverberation in the felt work Cloud, or in her enormous scale video establishment Momentum which reproduces a youth move execution. Utilizing the camera as an impetus, Simpson builds work involving content and pictures, parts to wholes, which remark on the narrative idea of found or organized pictures. In Simpson's most recent works, trademark inner conflict is given foggy ink washes to introduce secluded figures in the midst of indistinct spaces–an arrival to and takeoff from her prior unidentified figures in an extended investigation of contemporary culture.

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